Saturday, October 31, 2009

Order Your 2010 American Association Collectible Wall Calendar


For the past five years I've offered my subscribers a chance to order a wall calendar featuring vintage American Association photos for each month. This year I'm expanding my range by offering the calendar to readers of my online services, namely this blog and the blog I maintain at www.theoldaa.wordpress.com.

You are being hereby invited to order the 2010 edition of the American Association's Collectible Wall Calendar, so consider this your formal invitation!

The calendar, 11x17 in its finished format, is entirely designed, created, researched and produced by yours truly. I believe you will find this a handsome and unique addition to your wall space, one you'll enjoy using throughout the year. This year's calendar will be the most comprehensive and replete edition yet.

With gift-giving season approaching, now is the time to make those holiday plans. The uniqueness of this handcrafted item makes a suitable gift for the discriminating receiver in your circle of friends or family.

Boasting 12 exciting historical American Association photos, including stadiums, team photos, the story of this intriguing regional minor league will unfold before your eyes on a daily basis. It is highly unlikely you have ever seen even one of these photos in the past. One color photograph is included in the lineup for 2010, and each of the eight teams, including the Columbus Red Birds, the Indianapolis Indians, the Louisville Colonels, the Kansas City Blues, Milwaukee Brewers, Minneapolis Millers and Toledo Mud Hens is represented at least once. Each photo is chosen on the merits of its uniqueness in the photographic annals of baseball history.

The 2010 American Association Collectible Wall Calendar will make a useful and practical office adjunct, and is suitable as the ideal gift-giving option. Proceeds from the sales of the calendars help offset my research costs. As an independent researcher and writer, I am not paid by an entity of any kind, and in order to maintain my operations I must seek alternative funding methods, such as selling the calendars, as a way to offset my general costs.

The cost of this year's calendar is $20 including shipping. Multiple orders will require additional shipping, rate to be determined. Combine your orders with a subscription and save!

For those contemplating subscribing to the Almanac, you may purchase a calendar at 10% off for a single-year subscription ($18) or 15% off for two-year subscriptions ($36).

Order by December 1 to assure prompt holiday delivery. You will not be disappointed in this year's edition, with its plethora of fascinating facts, player birthdays, player death days, and your traditional calendaric information.

I strongly recommend placing your orders soon as I print these on a very limited basis.

And thanks again for your interest in the old American Association!

Monday, September 28, 2009

Wrap Up on the 1909 American Association Season and Key Louisville Stats

Two games were played to wrap up the 1909 American Association season, both at Swayne Field in Toledo. The results from those games are provided here for the sake of completeness.

Game 1
Toledo Mud Hens.....5
Minneapolis Millers.....3
After jumping on Irv Young for four runs in the first inning, the Mud Hens kept the Millers at bay as Earl "Chink" Yingling picked up the win during Game one of this Monday doubleheader. Toledo first-baseman, and former Miller, Jeremiah "Buck" Freeman, homered for the Hens in that productive first frame.

Game 2
Minneapolis Millers.....5
Toledo Mud Hens.....3 (five innings)
The Millers flipped it around on the hosts in Game two in the league's season finale. After grabbing a two-run lead in the second, the Hens gave up a pair in the fourth, and reclaimed the lead in their half of the fourth with one run. But the Millers rallied with three runs in the fifth and final frame, and the Hens could not answer. Tom Hughes the winner for the visitors; lefty Frederick Donovan took the loss.

A note concerning the final standings. There is some confusion over the exact record for each of the three contending teams, as the running tally presented in this blog in the past week does not line up with the record posted in Sporting Life; likely, a few box scores were omitted at some point during the season.

Here are the final standings as published in Sporting Life and substantiated by Marshall Wright's American Association roster book (1994):

Louisville.....93-75
Milwaukee.....90-77
Minneapolis.....88-79
Indianapolis.....83-85
St. Paul.....80-83
Toledo.....80-86
Columbus.....80-87
Kansas City.....71-93

Here is a summary of the pennant race published in the October 9, 1909 edition of Sporting Life:

END OF THE CAMPAIGN

The Eighth Consecutive Race of the Great Organization Results in Louisville's Triumph After the Closest Race in the
History of the Association.

The eighth annual championship race of the American Association, which began April 14, ended September 27, during which time this organization achieved the unprecedented feat of crowding in and playing out a 168-game schedule. The 1909 race was the closest and most remarkable in the history of this organization. From start to finish four teams -- Milwaukee, Louisville, Minneapolis and Indianapolis -- made a desperate fight for the flag, and each in turn at some time seemed destined to land the prize. At the same time no a team was ever out of the race until towards the end. In the last month of the campaign the fight had apparently narrowed down to Milwaukee and Minneapolis, with chances favoring the former. But in the last week of the season Louisville took advantage of a temporary faltering of the leaders, brought itself abreast of them, and two days before the season closed the Colonels went to the front and remained there to the close, thus giving Louisville the American Association championship for the first time. Milwaukee's great work of 1909 under [Louisville native] John McCloskey's management, was rewarded with the [second] place -- a great gain over last year when the Brewers finished sixth. Minneapolis also made a tremendous gain in finishing third as against fifth last year. The champion Indianapolis team was left at the post, but later braced up and made a long and game struggle to overcome the handicap of a miserable start -- an effort which, contrary to expectations, was rewarded with the respectable fourth place. St. Paul, under Mike kelley's management, recovered much of its ancient power and prestige and finished a close fifth, as against last in 1908. Toledo and Columbus were the sole disappointments of the season, the Mudhens dropping from the first division to a sixth place finish this year and Columbus falling from third last year to seventh this season. The closeness of the race is demonstrated by the fact that there was a difference of only 121 percentage points between the championship team and the tail-ender. The high class of ball tendered the patrons of the American Association was appreciated and the attendance exceeded even the liberal total of last year, every club thus clearing more or less profit. The affairs of the league were well conducted by President [Joseph] O'Brien and there was general good order on the field and a remarkable absence of contention among the magnates.

###

Some Key Louisville Stats

Team vs. team won-loss records for 1909:
vs. Milwaukee: 9-15

vs. Minneapolis: 11-13
vs. Indianapolis: 15-9
vs. St. Paul: 14-10

Louisville Batting Leaders
Batting Average: Jack Dunleavy (OF), .244
Runs Scored: Orville Woodruff (OF/3b), 66
Hits: Emery Olson (2b), 151
Doubles: Emery Olson and Frank Delahanty (OF), 22
Triples: Emery Olson and Orville Woodruff, 7
Home Runs: Frank Delahanty, 3
Stolen Bases: Emery Olson and Jack Dunleavy, 34
Games Played: Emery Olson, 170
Games Played at Position: Emery Olson, 167 (2b)

Louisville Pitching Leaders
Wins: Orville Selby, 20
Winning Percentage: Orville Selby, .606
Games: Orville Selby, 41
Innings Pitched: Orville Selby, 305
Strikeouts: Bill Hogg, 125

Louisville Offensive Team Rankings
Runs Scored: 7th (511)
Hits: 6th (1,237)
Doubles: 7th (169)
Triples: 5th (42)
Home Runs: 6th (13)
Stolen Bases: 1st (203)
Batting Average: 6th (.233)
The cumulative league batting average: .237

Despite the statistical breakdown shown above, Louisville was able to use its strength in pitching to out-duel the other seven American Association teams. After its second-place finish in 1908 (88-65), the Colonels capitalized on a late-season surge to surpass the front-runners, Milwaukee and Minneapolis, pulling away in the final days of the season to nail down the American Association crown for 1909.

Hail to the Champs, the 1909 Louisville Colonels,
One Hundred Years ago Today!



Vintage Baseball Cards from 1909

The American Association is fairly well-represented in the T-206 set of vintage tobacco cards from 1909. Here is a link for some Louisville samples, in celebration of their magical capture of the American Association flag..."one hundred years ago today!"

http://baseballcards.galib.uga.edu/cgi/bball?action=query&term_a=louisville&index_a=kw&grid=3&format=_contact&_cc=1

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Games of Sunday, Sept. 26, 1909

With the pennant sewn up by the Louisville Colonels, it's a moot point to include the scores but for the sake of completeness, here are today's games for the top three finishers:

At Louisville's Eclipse Park
Game 1
Louisville Colonels.....6
Kansas City Blues.....5
The Colonels surmounted a rally after being down 4-0 after one inning of play, scoring three in the second, one in the third and two in the fourth frames. Hippo Vaughn the winnder, Gus Dorner the loser.

Game 2
Kansas City Blues.....5
Louisville Colonels.....3 (seven innings)
Again the Blues scored four in the first inning as John Clayton, appearing in only his fourth game of the season (his first was August 23), lasted only two-thirds of an inning before Gene Packard came on in relief. The Blues' "Vinegar Bill" Essick was the winner in a complete game performance against the champion Colonels. This was the final game of the season for both teams.

At Swayne Field, Toledo
Game 1
Minneapolis Millers.....3
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
Nick Altrock contained the Hens on five hits as the Millers scored single runs in each of the first three innings in this inconsequential battle. Catcher Joe Rapp had three hits for the visitors.

Game 2
Toledo Mud Hens.....10
Minneapolis Millers.....3
The Hens had their whoopin' sticks out against Lou Fiene in this six inning game. Eight Minneapolis errors contributed to their loss, but Toledo won by "hard, consecutive hitting," according to Sporting Life.

At Neil Park in Columbus
Game 1
Milwaukee Brewers.....10
Columbus Senators.....9
Despite seven late-inning runs posted by the home team, the Brewers held on for the win in a game featuring offense, the Senators with 14, Milwaukee with 15. A home run by catcher Tony James was a highlight for Columbus. The Brews sent six runs across the plate in the sixth.

Game 2
Columbus Senators.....5
Milwaukee Brewers.....4 (five innings)
The Senators evened things up with a rally in their last inning, scoring three off Frank Schneiberg, despite 14 Milwaukee safeties. This game ended the season for both teams.

And that's your American Association scoreboard for the final Sunday games of the 1909 Championship campaign. Tomorrow a summary of the season presented in Sporting Life will be provided.

Saturday, September 26, 2009

Louisville Clinches!


Games of Saturday, Sept. 25, 1909

At Eclipse Park, Louisville
Louisville Colonels.....4
Kansas City Blues....2
Jumping out to a 2-0 lead in the bottom of the first inning set the Colonels up for the most important victory in the history of their American Association franchise. Jake Thielman held the Blues scoreless until the sixth, making it a one-run game. In the Louisville eighth the hosts padded their lead with a pair, and KC answered with a lone tally in the ninth. But it wasn't enough, as the Louisville Colonels nailed down the victory and clinched the American Association pennant in the process, the Brewers splitting their doubleheader in Columbus. It was an unusual contest, the Blues out-hitting the Colonels 11-4. But things were going Louisville's way the past two weeks and this game was no exception. Former Colonel hurler Patsy Flaherty the unlikely loser in this one.

At Neil Park, Columbus
Game 1
Milwaukee Brewers.....6
Columbus Senators.....0
Milwaukee native Lou Manske shut down the hosts on four hits while the Brewers ganged up on Rube Geyer with five runs in the third inning. The victory was Milwaukee's first of the 1909 campaign in Columbus.

Game 2
Columbus Senators.....4
Milwaukee Brewers.....3
The Brewers needed this game to stay in contention for the pennant, but the Senators pulled out a win with a two-out run in the ninth, dashing Milwaukee's hopes for their first American Association pennant. Stoney McGlynn, the iron man of the Milwaukee mound corps, was the loser, getting little support as the Brewers had only two hits; they took advantage of Columbus' five errors in scoring three runs to tie the game in the fourth. Clyde Goodwin brought home the win in the Senators' spoiler role, not only by pitching well, but by scoring the winning run. Sporting Life: "Goodwin beat McGlynn in the second game, scoring the winning run himself in the ninth on a lucky single and Josh Clarke's hit to the fence. Milwaukee got its three runs without the aid of a hit."

At Swayne Field, Toledo
Game 1
Toledo Mud Hens.....7
Minneapolis Millers.....2
Dan McSurdy the winner, Tom Hughes the loser. The hosts put up four runs in the second to seal their advantage.

Game 2
Toledo Mud Hens.....6
Minneapolis Millers.....2 (five innings)
By dropping both games of the twin-bill the Millers took themselves out of contention and allowed Louisville to clinch. Toledo scored in each of the four innings they took their at-bats off Roy Patterson. Ray Hancock the winning hurler for the Hens.

By clinching the pennant, Louisville would have their first league championship in the American Association. And that's your update for Saturday, Sept. 25, 1909, one hundred years ago today! More to follow.....stay tuned!

Friday, September 25, 2009

The 1909 Championship Race Winds Down

Friday, September 24, 1909

At Louisville's Eclipse Park
Louisville Colonels.....4
Kansas City Blues.....1
The Colonels gain a game over the Brewers in the pennant race by defeating Kansas City. The Blues jumped out to an early lead against Jack Halla in the second, but the Colonels come back in the third with a pair. Those runs proved all they'd need in wrapping up another win. Halla was relieved in the second by Gene Packard who sewed up the victory for the hosts. Colonels center-fielder Frank Delahanty hit a home run to thrill the home crowd and boost the club's chances against a tough left-hander, Billy Campbell. It was an important win for Louisville in combination with the Milwaukee loss in Columbus.


At Columbus' Neil Park
Columbus Senators.....4
Milwaukee Brewers.....2
The Senators dampen Milwaukee's chances in the pennant race by scoring three runs in the eighth frame off Brewer starter Charlie Wacker who absorbed the loss in this critical game. The Brewers fall to 88-75 and are now a game and a half behind the Colonels in the race for the flag. According to Sporting Life, "Al Nelson (RHP), who should have been scored upon, started a batting rally in the eighth that gave Columbus the first game of the series. He sent a two-bagger to left centre. Bill Ludwig erred when Josh Clarke bunted. Quinlan sacrificed. Art Krueger went out, but Bunk Congalton and Fred Odwell made singles, putting the game out of reach of the second place club." (first names added; note spelling of "center").

Minneapolis was off today.

And that's your scoreboard for Friday, Sept. 24, 1909 as this thrilling pennant race begins to wind down! Stay tuned.......

And that's y

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Pennant Race Update for Thursday, Sept. 23, 1909

At Swayne Field, Toledo
For the second straight day a doubleheader was on the docket against the Mud Hens and Milwaukee Brewers but the second game was called because of darkness after six inning with neither team scoring.
Game 1
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
Milwaukee Brewers.....1
Milwaukee's Stoney McGlynn held the Hens to four hits in eight innings but yielded two runs in the fourth which proved the deciding factor in the loss, the Brewers getting nine scattered hits of Toledo's Karl Robinson.

Game 2
Called due to darkness after six innings.

At Eclipse Park in Louisville
St. Paul Saints.....3
Louisville Colonels.....1
St. Paul scored a pair in the third and were never behind after that. Louis Leroy the winner, Bill Hogg the loser as both pitchers went the distance. The Saints outhit the front-running Colonels, 11-4.

At Neil Park in Columbus
The Minneapolis Millers and Columbus Senators game was washed out by rain. The Millers gain a half-game on Louisville in the standings.

And that's your abbreviated American Association scoreboard for Thursday, Sept. 23, 1909, one hundred years ago today!

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Pennant Race Update for Wednesday, Sept. 22, 1909

The Louisville Colonels take over first place with a sweep of their doubleheader against the St. Paul Saints.

At Louisville's Eclipse Park
Game 1
Louisville Colonels.....4
St. Paul Saints.....2
By the time the Saints scored their runs in the sixth, the Colonels already had three, tacking on an insurance run in the eighth to get the "W" for Hippo Vaughn, Elmer Steele the loser. Vaughn had a home run on his own behalf.

Game 2
Louisville Colonels.....8
St. Paul Saints.....4 (seven innings)
Louisville bats busted out in the first inning with six runs, deciding the game early as Frank Decanniere went the whole route in this abbreviated contest, Hank Gehring the loser. The Colonels take over first place from Milwaukee with wins 87 and 88.

At Toledo's Swayne Field
Game 1
Toledo Mud Hens.....6
Milwaukee Brewers.....2
The Hens score a pair in the first inning and go on to take the first game of a doubleheader, Hi West the winner, Paul Stowers the loser as the Brewers lose ground to the Colonels in the great pennant race of 1909.

Game 2
After six innings the came was called due to darkness with no runs being scored by either team.

At Neil Park in Columbus
Game 1
Columbus Senators.....4
Minneapolis Millers.....3
Sporting Life: "Columbus practically spoiled the pennant chances of Minneapolis by takng both games of the double-header. Shortstop Andy Oyler, of Minneapolis, was hit in the head by a pitched ball in the eigth inning of the first game and was taken to the hospital. He will be laid up for some time. The Minneapolis third baseman, Jimmy Collins, injured a shoulder sliding to second in the seventh, but kept at play until the tenth inning when hits by Clyde Goodwin and Larry Quinlan decided the game." Clyde Goodwin the winner, Irving Young the loser.

Game 2
Columbus Senators.....5
Minneapolis Millers.....4
Sporting News: At intervals in the second game, which Columbus won by a narrow margin, Umpire Hayes was busy having particiapants removed from the field. President Mike Cantillon and player Otis Clymer, of the Minneapolis Club, were banished. Outfielder Josh Clarke, of Columbus, was benched in the eighth. Quinlan and Congalton made hits in the seventh, giving Columbus the deciding run. Fred Link the winner, Lou Fiene the loser.

The second-division teams play spoiler in the race for the flag today, the Brewers and Millers being victimized and getting knocked down a few pegs in the standings. Here's how the standings look including games played today:

Louisville.....88-72..... .550
Milwaukee....88-73.... .547
Minneapolis...85-73.... .538

And that's your update for Wednesday, Sept. 22, 1909, as the race stays tight and the Colonels grab the top rung...one hundred years ago today!
...to be continued.....

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

1909 Pennant Race Update: Tuesday, Sept. 21, 1909

At Louisville's Eclipse Park
Game 1
Louisville Colonels.....2
St. Paul Saints.....1
Both clubs mustered only four hits each in a classic pitcher's duel, as the Colonels maintained their surge in the standings. A recent arrival (9/14), center-fielder Ernie Diehl, belted a home run, no easy task at Eclipse Park. Louisville's two-run first held for pitcher Bill Hogg; Charlie Chech was the loser.

Game 2
Louisville Colonels.....3
St. Paul Saints.....2
A three-run rally in the seventh frame sealed the tilt for the Colonels as they completed the sweep against the Saints in another very close game. Orville Kilroy was the loser as Gene Packard the winner in this abbreviated affair, as darkness descended. The Colonels gain a half-game on Milwaukee and Minneapolis.

At Toledo's Swayne Field
Milwaukee Brewers.....6
Toledo Mud Hens.....1
With the win the Brewers lost only a half-game to the sizzling Colonels. Posting three in the first and two in the third put the game out of reach from the outset, Tom Dougherty the winner, Frank Owen the loser. Sixteen hits erupted from Brewer bats, nine off Owen in three innings. The Milwaukee offense featured two doubles by third-baseman Harry "Pep" Clark and a triple by center-fielder Amos Strunk.

At Columbus' Neil Park
Minneapolis Millers.....2
Columbus Senators.....1
The Millers scored their pair in the first frame and pitcher Nick Altrock held the locals to one tally in the fifth on four hits. Bill "Duke" Kenworthy took the loss for the Senators. Five Columbus errors, three by second-baseman John Cullen, gave Kenworthy fits.

The Louisville Colonels continue their charge up Pennant Hill, but remain in third-place, one percentage point behind the Millers. The Brewers are atop the standings with a record of 88-72 (.555), two games in front of the Millers.

And that's your update for games played Tuesday, Sept. 21, 1909, one hundred years ago today in the American Association!

Monday, September 21, 2009

The 1909 Pennant Race: Games of Monday, Sept. 20

At Louisville's Eclipse Park:
Louisville Colonels.....5
Minneapolis Millers.....3
The Colonels outhit the Millers 14-7 as Frank Decanniere defeats spitball artist Roy Patterson in the final game of the series. Despite the advantage in the hits column, it was a close game throughout. Louisville played errorless ball, and catcher Johnny "Runt" Hughes went four-of-four with a home run for the hosts.

At Indianapolis' Washington Park:
Milwaukee Brewers.....1
Indianapolis Indians.....0
Stoney McGlynn tosses another shutout on his way to another of his league record 14 blankings, stopping the Indians on two hits. McGlynn had a double against the Tribe, showing he could still wield the willow well for an old-timer! Indianapolis threatened in the ninth by putting two runners on base with one out, but the magician of the mound for Milwaukee put out the fire to enable the Brewers to keep pace with the Colonels who defeated Minneapolis.

And that's your update for the 1909 pennant race, 100 years ago today in the American Association!

The 1909 Pennant Race Update for Sept. 19

From now until the end of the American Association season, only scores involving the pennant contenders will be listed here.

Here is the scoreboard for Sunday, Sept. 19, 1909

The Louisville Colonels hosted the Minneapolis Millers in a doubleheader at Eclipse Park:

Game 1
Louisville...8
Minneapolis...3
The Colonels had their way with Lou Fiene, smacking 14 hits on their way to a win. Orville Selby was relieved by Gene Packard for Louisville in the sixth; Selby was the winner. Louisville posted two runs in both the third and fourth frames, and the Millers were unable to mount a sufficient comeback, scoring two in the sixth, and one in the seventh. Louisville third-baseman Orville Woodruff went 3-for-5, all singles, while the lower five in the lineup all had two hits each. The Millers left 11 on base and made five errors.

Game 2
Louisville...3
Minneapolis...2
Again the defensive work of the Millers was lacking, three errors enabling the Colonels to take Game 2 for a sweep at Eclipse Park. The Colonels jumped out to an early lead in the first inning with a run, but Minneapolis tallied twice in the second for a short-lived lead as the hosts posted three runs in the third. At that rate the scoring could have mounted considerably! But there were no more runs scored, and the game was called on account of darkness after the Miller seventh. Hippo Vaughn was the winner, with Tom Hughes taking the loss as the Colonels came to within a game of first place.

At Washington Park, Indianapolis
Indianapolis...2
Milwaukee...0
The Brewers saw their fortunes dip as they were victimized by Larry Cheney who held them to two hits while walking two and striking out three. The fourth-place Tribe had eight safeties off Brewer starting pitcher Tom "Sugar Boy" Dougherty, who also had one of the Brewers two hits, who suffered the loss. Four Brewer errors but they did not directly impact the scoring.

Louisville gains momentum in the pennant race!

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Standings and Scoreboard for Sept. 18, 1909

Here are the standings for Sept. 18, 1909 inclusive of the day's games, as appeared in Sporting Life. Venues hosting pennant contenders are highlighted in yellow.

Minneapolis.....84-68..... .553
Milwaukee.....86-71..... .548
Louisville.....81-72..... .529
St. Paul.....74-77..... .490
Indianapolis.....77-81..... .487
Columbus.....78-82..... .478
Toledo.....72-81..... .470
Kansas City.....69-86..... .445

====================
At Eclipse Park, Louisville
Minneapolis Millers.....2
Louisville Colonels.....1
The Millers won the second game in the series in a squeaker, posting one run in the ninth for which Louisville could not answer against Nick Altrock. Bill Hogg was the loser despite allowing only five hits.

At Washington Park, Indianapolis
Game 1
Indianapolis Indians.....6
Milwaukee Brewers.....5
The Indians rallied against Frank Schneiberg to score two runs with two out in the ninth to take game one, Oscar Graham the winner in relief of Vive Lindaman.

Game 2
Indianapolis Indians.....5
Milwaukee Brewers.....0
Oscar Graham held Milwaukee in check with three hits when the game was called in the eighth on account of darkness as the Brewers lose first-place to the Millers.

At Neil Park, Columbus
Game 1
Columbus Senators.....7
Kansas City Blues.....1
Clyde Goodwin the winner over Gus Dorner.

Game 2
Columbus Senators.....1
Kansas City Blues.....0
Fred Link held the Blues to two hits in posting the shutout.

At Swayne Field, Toledo
Toledo Mud Hens.....3
St. Paul Saints.....2
Karl Robinson the winner, Charlie Chech the loser.

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Scores for Friday, Sept. 17, 1909

Today's games had a substantial effect on the American Association pennant race of 1909. A shift in the standings is the result of the day's actions, as the battle for the top spot continues to heat up. Venues hosting pennant contenders are highlighted in yellow.

At Eclipse Park, Louisville
Louisville Colonels.....3
Minneapolis Millers.....1
The Colonels score twice off "Long Tom" Hughes in the first inning. Hughes settles down and held them to only four hits on the day, but Louisville's Frank Decanniere is on his game as well, scattering six hits during the opening game of the series.

At Washington Park, Indianapolis
Indianapolis Indians.....5
Milwaukee Brewers.....2
The fifth-place Indians have their way with Charlie Wacker in securing the first game of their series. The Brewers were ahead 2-1 until Wacker unwound in the eighth as the hosts scored four runs, enabling Oscar Graham, in for starter Walt Slagle, to pick up the win. Milwaukee continues its late-season slide.

At Swayne Field, Toledo
St. Paul Saints.....3
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
The Hens score twice in the ninth but it isn't quite enough, as Orville Kilroy nails down the victory in a complete game four-hitter.

At Neil Park, Columbus
Kansas City Blues.....2
Columbus Senators.....0
Veteran Patsy Flaherty contains the Senators, scattering seven singles in a game which transpires in one hour, 19 minutes.

And that's your complete American Association scoreboard for Friday, Sept. 18, one hundred years ago today!

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Scores for Thursday, Sept. 16, 1909

The pennant race heats up!

At Louisville's Eclipse Park
Louisville Colonels.....4
Milwaukee Brewers.....0
The Brewers gift-wrap this one, committing six errors. Gene Packard allows only four hits as his Colonels make the most of their five hits. Stoney McGlynn is pulled after two innings as Milwaukee's lead over Louisville slips a game.

At Washington Park, Indianapolis
Indianapolis Indians.....9
Minneapolis Millers.....2
The Indians turn the tables on the Millers, defeating them by the same score as the previous day's. Tribe's manager/first-baseman Charlie Carr hits a home run.

At Swayne Field, Toledo
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
Kansas City Blues.....1
Again the Hens win, 2-1, this time in dramatic style by tallying with two outs in the ninth. With Frank Owen on the hill for the Hens, the Blues muster only four hits, one a seventh-inning home run by second baseman Jack Love. By taking four-straight from KC they climb above Columbus in the standings and now occupy sixth place.

At Neil Park, Columbus
St. Paul Saints.....9
Columbus Senators.....0
With a decisive seven-hit shutout authored by Louis Leroy, the Native American pitcher for St. Paul, the Saints cap their trip to Columbus before heading for Toledo. St. Paul shortstop Al Boucher has two triples in the affair. Leroy is in peak form, never allowing more than one hit in any inning.

And that's your American Association scoreboard for Thursday, Sept. 16, 1909, one hundred years ago today!

Scores for Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1909: The Pennant Race

Venues hosting American Association pennant contenders are highlighted in yellow.

The premier event takes place at Louisville:

At Louisville's Eclipse Park
Game 1
Milwaukee Brewers.....5
Louisville Colonels.....2
Stoney McGlynn comes away with the win, allowing only four hits.

Game 2
Louisville Colonels.....1
Milwaukee Brewers.....0
McGlynn is the pick for the second game and permits only four hits, as the contest is called after seven frames. The Colonels lose no ground to the front-running Brewers.

At Washington Park, Indianapolis
Minneapolis Millers.....9
Indianapolis Indians.....2
Minneapolis scores three in the second inning and coasts to a win, picking up a half-game on Milwaukee. Starting pitcher Lou Fiene gets two hits and holds the Tribe to five hits, as the Millers win their third straight behind solid hitting. Center-fielder Bill "Tip" O'Neill, hitting out of the lead-off spot, goes three-for four with three triples, becoming the first American Association batter to accomplish this feat (which does not happen to appear in the American Association record books). O'Neill shares this distinction with nine other players. American Association history uncovered after 100 years!

At Neil Park, Columbus
Game 1
St. Paul Saints.....5
Columbus Senators.....3
The visiting Saints pull out a win with a two-run rally in the ninth frame.

Game 2
St. Paul Saints.....6
Columbus Senators.....1
With four runs in the first inning, the Saints sat in the catbird seat for this seven-inning event which was called because of darkness.

At Swayne Field, Toledo
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
Kansas City Blues.....1
Ohio native Earl "Chink" Yingling pockets a "W" as the Hens stay out of the cellar.

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Eye on the Race: Scores for Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1909

Venues hosting pennant contenders Milwaukee, Minneapolis and Louisville are highlighted in yellow.

Games of Tuesday, September 14, 1909

At Eclipse Park in Louisville
Game 1
Louisville Colonels.....7
Milwaukee Brewers.....3

Game 2
Louisville Colonels.....2
Milwaukee Brewers.....1
(eight innings; called on account of darkness)

The Colonels pick up two games on the first-place Brewers.
Bill Hogg is the winner in Game 1 behind perfect defense.
In Game 2, Jack Halla halts the Milwaukees despite only four Louisville hits, two of which were his own!

At Neil Park in Columbus
Columbus Senators.....5
St. Paul Saints.....0
Clyde Goodwin shuts down the Saints on six hits as the Senators play errorless ball.

At West Washington Park, Indianapolis
Minneapolis Millers.....3
Indianapolis Indians.....2
The Millers pick up a game and a half on the Brewers as Nick Altrock pockets the win over Oscar Graham.

At Swayne Field, Toledo
Toledo Mud Hens.....7
Kansas City Blues.....6
The Mud Hens flap 14 hits in support of pitcher Hi West. Sporting Life: “In a game replete with sensational fielding and heavy hitting, the Toledo team won again from Kansas City to-day.” West triples on his own behalf.

And that’s your updated American Association scoreboard for Tuesday, September 14, one hundred years ago today!

Monday, September 14, 2009

Scores for Monday, Sept. 13, 1909

Site of games hosting pennant contenders is highlighted in yellow.

At Toledo's Swayne Field
Toledo Mud Hens.....4
Kansas City Blues.....2
Sebron Booles gets the "W" for the Hens, his only victory of the season.

At Columbus' Neil Park
Columbus Senators.....5
St. Paul Saints.....0
Glenn Liebhardt masters the Saints on four hits, striking out eight and walking two.

At Indianapolis' West Washington Street Park
Minneapolis Millers.....3
Indianapolis Indians.....2
The Millers stage a dramatic three-run ninth inning rally to upstage the host Indians, picking up a half-game on the Brewers.

At Louisville's Eclipse Park
Milwaukee Brewers.....0
Louisville Colonels.....0
Play was called after 11 frames on account of darkness. Milwaukee iron man Stoney McGlynn was still in the box for the Brewers, having allowed only four hits; Frank Decanniere yielded seven hits and was the only Colonel pitcher.

And that's your scoreboard for Monday, Sept. 13, one hundred years ago today!

Pennant Race Summary of Week Ending September 11, 1909

There was little movement among the contenders in the American Association standings ending the week of Sept. 11, 1909. With three weeks to play, the record stood as follows:

Milwaukee Brewers.....85-63
Minneapolis Millers.....80-64....3 games back
Louisville Colonels.....75-69....8 games back

Playing all games at home, the Brewers won six, lost four. After losing a doubleheader to the Millers, Milwaukee took the remaining two games in the series ending Sept. 8. Their 7-1 win over St. Paul on Sept. 11 helped them maintain their lead over both the Millers and Colonels who suffered defeats.

After beating St. Paul to end their homestand Sept. 5, the Millers headed for Milwaukee and Kansas City. They won five, lost four during the week.

The Colonels won five games on the road, and finished the week with six wins, four losses. Losing both ends of a doubleheader Sept. 6 at Indianapolis, they bounced back to sweep the Indians in their Sept. 7 twin bill in a game featuring two shutout performances, the first a six-hitter by Hippo Vaughn, followed by Orville Selby's four-hitter.

Louisville was not going away, and the Millers were still hot on the heels of the Brewers. How would the remaining weeks play out? Daily updates will be recorded here for American Association followers to keep up with the developments as they took place one hundred years ago this week. Please see earlier blogs for the preceding daily scoreboard results in the American Association.

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Scoreboard for Sunday, September 12, 1909

Pennant contenders are highlighted in yellow:

Association Park, Kansas City
Game 1
Kansas City Blues.....4
Minneapolis Millers.....2
Veteran Patsy Flaherty picks up the win in the opening game.

Game 2
Kansas City Blues.....4
Minneapolis Millers.....1
The Millers' pennant hopes darken after being swept by the last-place Blues.

Athletic Park, Milwaukee
St. Paul Saints.....5
Milwaukee Brewers.....3
The Saints score three in the first inning and preserve their lead for the victory. Brewer pitcher Paul Stowers is the unlikely owner of a home run.

Eclipse Park, Louisville
Game 1
Louisville Colonels.....5
Toledo Mud Hens.....3
The Colonels pick up a game on the Brewers by capturing the first game in their pair with the Hens. A three-run fourth inning sets the table as Hippo Vaughn picks up the win.

Game 2
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
Louisville Colonels.....1
Louisville left fielder Frank Delahanty hit "a clean home run" but owing to the ground rules in place because of the overflow crowd, it was ruled a double and the the Hens salvage a split in the five-inning affair. The game ended early in order to allow the Toledo team to catch their train back home.

West Washington Street Park, Indianapolis
Indianapolis Indians .....5
Columbus Senators.....4
The Tribe holds on for the win despite a two-run rally by the Senators in the ninth.

That sums up the American Association scoreboard for September 12, one-hundred years ago today!

Scoreboard for Sunday, September 12, 1909

Saturday, September 12, 2009

Scoreboard for Saturday, September 11, 1909

West Washington Street Park, Indianapolis
Game 1
Indianapolis Indians.....7
Columbus Senators.....6
The Indians grab game one of a doubleheader in 12 innings.

Game 2
Indianapolis Indians.....7
Columbus Senators.....2
Indians complete a sweep of the twin bill in a five-inning affair halted by darkness. The Senators commit five errors in each contest.

Association Park, Kansas City
Kansas City Blues.....4
Minneapolis Millers.....3
Paul Carter pitches a complete game for the Blues.

Athletic Park, Milwaukee
Milwaukee Brewers.....7
St. Paul Saints.....1
Brewers tighten their grip on first-place with a win in a game that was decided in the second frame, scoring three runs off Louis Leroy.

Eclipse Park, Louisville
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
Louisville Colonels.....0
The Colonels drop a game in the standings as Toledo's Frank Owen twirls a six-hitter.

That's the wrap for the Saturday scoreboard, Sept. 11, 1909, one hundred years ago today!

Friday, September 11, 2009

Scoreboard for Friday, September 10, 1909

The American Association pennant race heats up! Here is your scoreboard Friday's games, with contenders highlighted in yellow:

Athletic Park, Milwaukee
St. Paul Saints.....4
Milwaukee Brewers.....3
The Brewers swat 16 safeties but submit to St. Paul. Recent call-up Sylvester Breen hits a home run for the Saints. Charlie Chech goes seven innings for the win.

West Washington Park, Indianapolis
Indianapolis.....6
Columbus Senators.....4
The Indians survive a 4-run fifth by the visitors as Walt Slagle earns the win.

Association Park, Kansas City
Minneapolis Millers.....3
Kansas City Blues....2
Third-baseman/manager Jimmy Collins swats a circuit drive, the deciding run, against veteran pitcher Ducky Swann. The Millers gain a game on the front-running Brewers. The game was attended by the nation's Vice President, James S. Sherman.

Eclipse Park, Louisville
The game between the Toledo Mud Hens and Louisville Colonels was postponed by rain.

And that's your American Association scoreboard for Friday, September 10, 1909, one hundred years ago today!

Thursday, September 10, 2009

American Association Scoreboard for Thursday, Sept. 9, 1909

Please refer to earlier blog for a summary of the American Association 1909 pennant race. Here are the scores for Sept. 9. Contenders are highlighted in yellow.

At Eclipse Park in Louisville
Louisville Colonels.....8
Toledo Mud Hens.....2
Colonels second-baseman Emery Olson hit a rare home run. Toledo committed five errors, as Bill Hogg came away with the win.

At Association Park in Kansas City
Minneapolis Millers.....3
Kansas City Blues.....0
Spitball artist Roy Patterson tossed a two-hit shutout.

At Athletic Park in Milwaukee
St. Paul Saints.....3
Milwaukee Brewers.....2
Orville Kilroy came away the winner for the Saints.

At Indianapolis
Columbus Senators vs. Indianapolis Indians was postponed due to rain.

Both Louisville and Minneapolis gained a game on the first-place Brewers.

And that's your scoreboard for the games of Thursday, Sept. 9, 1909, one hundred years ago today!

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

American Association Scoreboard for Wednesday, September 8, 1909

Your American Association Scoreboard for
Wednesday, September 8, 1909

At Kansas City's Association Park
Game 1
St. Paul Saints.....6
Kansas City Blues.....1

Game 2
St. Paul Saints.....4
Kansas City Blues.....3 (seven innings)

At Columbus' Neil Park
Columbus Senators.....8
Toledo Mud Hens.......1

At Milwaukee's Athletic Park
Milwaukee Brewers.....2
Minneapolis Millers.....0
Despite a two-hitter by Irving "Young Cy" Young, the Brewers score one in the first and one in the third as Tom "Sugar Boy" Dougherty picks up the win

At Indianapolis' West Washington Street Park
Louisville Colonels.....7
Indianapolis Indians.....1
Aided by the strong pitching of 21-year-old Gene Packard and a 13-hit spree (all singles) by the Colonels, Louisville kept its pennant hopes alive

And that's your American Association scoreboard for September 8, one hundred years ago today!

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

American Association Scoreboard for Tuesday, Sept. 7, 1909

Here is your complete American Association scoreboard for September 7. Does the pennant race heat up or just simmer a bit?

At West Washington Park, Indianapolis
Game 1
Louisville Colonels........2
Indianapolis Indians.....0

Game 2
Louisville Colonels.......2
Indianapolis Indians.....0
21-year-old Hippo Vaughn and 20-game winner Orville Selby combine for a pair of shutouts, allowing the Indians ten hits on the day.

At Athletic Park, Milwaukee
Milwaukee Brewers.....6
Minneapolis Millers.....5
Brewers score a pair of 2-out runs in the ninth to overtake the Millers. Miller centerfielder Bill "Tip" O'Neill homered in the game.

At Neil Park, Columbus
Columbus Senators.....7
Toledo Mud Hens.....6
The Senators score in the tenth to pull out a win.

At Association Park in Kansas City, wet grounds prevented baseball action between the St. Paul Saints and Kansas City Blues today.

And that's your update for Tuesday, Sept. 7, 1909.


Monday, September 7, 2009

American Association Scoreboard for Monday, Sept. 6

Here is the updated scoreboard for the games played Monday, Sept. 6. Pennant contenders are highlighted in yellow.

At Neil Park, Columbus
Game 1
Columbus Senators.....8
Toledo Mud Hens.......2

Game 2
Toledo Mud Hens.......7
Columbus Senators.... 3

At West Washington Street Park, Indianapolis
Game 1
Indianapolis Indians.....3
Louisville Colonels........2

Game 2
Indianapolis Indians.....7
Louisville Colonels........1
Vive Lindaman stops the Colonels with five hittter

At Athletic Park, Milwaukee
Game 1
Minneapolis Millers.....8
Milwaukee Brewers......2
Millers jump on Stoney McGlynn with four in the first

Game 2
Minneapolis Millers.....1
Milwaukee Brewers......0
Tom Hughes blanks the Brewers on eight hits

At Kansas City's Association Park the Saints and Blues were rained out

Sunday, September 6, 2009

American Association Scoreboard for Sunday, Sept. 5, 1909

Please see previous blog for the full report on the 1909 American Association pennant race, as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of this exciting campaign. In order to help recapture the thrills of this long-forgotten championship run, daily updates will be presented here, and will continue throughout the 1909 battle. Louisville, Milwaukee and Minneapolis will be highlighted in boldface.

Update: Sunday, September 5, 1909

With the Milwaukee Brewers in front of the second-place Minneapolis Millers by 3.5 games and the Louisville Colonels behind by eight games to start the new week of play, here is the scoreboard for Sunday, September 5:

At Neil Park in Columbus:
Game 1
Columbus Senators 8
Louisville Colonels 3

Game 2
Louisville Colonels 5
Columbus Senators 4

At West Washington Street Park in Indianapolis
Indianapolis Indians 9
Toledo Mud Hens 7

At Lexington Park in St. Paul
Minneapolis Millers 1
St. Paul Saints 0
Nick Altrock throws two-hitter

At Athletic Park in Milwaukee
Game 1
Milwaukee Brewers 7
Kansas City Blues 6
Win results from 2-run rally in 9th

Game 2
Milwaukee Brewers 9
Kansas City Blues 2
Home Run: catcher Charlie Moran of Milwaukee

The 1909 Championship Race, Week Ending Sept. 4




As the American Association pennant race for 1909 continued along its tenuous course during late August and early September, here’s a look at how things shaped up between the principal contenders. From the above standings from the Sept. 11, 1909 issue of Sporting Life, the Brewers were still holding on to their perch, with the Millers and Colonels close behind. Note that the graphic's top section shows the won/loss record for each team in the league, while the standings are presented below.

The Brewers, winding up the week ending Sept. 4 with a 3.5 game lead over the Millers, were successful in maintaining their late season momentum by winning six, losing two, and outscoring opponents 52-35. Starting out against the Millers at Nicollet Park on Saturday, Aug. 28, Milwaukee took one on the chin, 17-10 (see details below). Then it was on to St. Paul where the Brewers took four of five from the fifth-place Saints in a series which included a four-hit shutout by Frank Schneiberg on Aug. 29. That contest featured three triples by Milwaukee third-baseman Harry “Pep” Clark. The Saints managed to salvage some respect by defeating John McCloskey’s Milwaukeeans 7-3 in the last game of the series. Entertaining Kansas City, the Brew Boys won three more games to end their nine-game week of play. In the second contest of their series with the last-place Blues, the Brewers served notice by blanking the visitors, 8-0, as Brewer ace Stoney McGlynn (age 37), landed his 12th shutout of the season, a four-hitter. Sporting Life reported, “McGlynn was in perfect form and master at all times.” With a 7-2 win against KC the next day, McCloskey's men capped a good week on the upswing by winning seven of nine. The momentum belonged to Milwaukee to start the month of September. Their record stood at 80 wins, 59 losses.


The Millers had an abbreviated schedule during which they won three, lost three. They had a productive offense during their homestand, outscoring their opponents 32-22, but could only win three of six meetings. The week started out with a resounding 17-10 trashing of the visiting Brewers, as the Millers pounded out 15 hits at Nicollet Park on Aug. 28. The game featured successive six-run innings for Minneapolis in frames four and five, sending Tom “Sugar Boy” Dougherty scurrying in the fourth. Reliever Charlie Wacker didn’t fare much better before Frank Schneiberg came on to stop the bleeding. The Millers came away with a win despite five errors; the Brewers committed seven in a wild affair. Manager/third-baseman Jimmy Collins had a perfect day with four singles in four at-bats, while second-sacker Jerry Downs had a 3-for-6 performance, including a double and a stolen base. A home run by Gavvy Cravath punctuated the victory as Irving “Young Cy” Young, the Millers' "Maine Man," came away with the win. Taking on the lowly Blues, the Millers won the first two outings but dropped the final pair to wind up their week, and the month of August. After “Long Tom” Hughes shut out the Blues on five hits, 8-0, in the first game of the set, the Millers were blanked on five hits in the fourth game by “Vinegar Bill” Essick, the second of two contests on Aug. 31 to end the series. Their final game of the week came Sept. 4 against their crosstown rival, the Saints. It resulted in a 4-0 shutout by St. Paul's veteran hurler, Charlie Chech, who allowed four hits while striking out only one. The Millers lost ground to the Brewers that week, and now had a record of 75 wins, 61 losses.


Starting out the week at home, Louisville wrapped up a series with the fourth-place Columbus Senators in a 6-3 loss at Eclipse Park. The Colonels then traveled to Toledo for a four-game set against the Mud Hens in which they took three of four at brand new Swayne Field. Each game at Toledo was decided by one run. In the finale, the Mud Hens shut out the visiting Colonels, 1-0, on a three-hit gem by righty Karl Robinson. Having scored only 12 runs in five games, Louisville finally showed some offense Sept. 2 at Neil Park in Columbus with a 9-6 win, keeping the Colonels within striking distance of the Brewers. A five-run eighth-inning rally highlighted the tilt for the visitors as reliever Frank Decanniere, in for Orville Selby, came away with the victory. Left-fielder Art Fenlon led the hitting attack for Louisville with three hits in five trips. The game featured two rare home runs (two in one game was exceptional), one by Louisville’s spunky catcher Johnny “Runt” Hughes and the other by the Senators left-fielder Josh Clarke. Columbus catcher Lee Fohl had four hits on the day for Bill Clymer’s Senators who remained out of contention with a record of 67-72.
On Sept. 4, the Colonels made it five of seven by defeating Columbus, 3-2, despite Glenn Liebhardt's seven-strikeout performance. The Night Riders, as they were known in Louisville, had outscored their opponents by a slim margin of 24-21 It was the 70th win for Heinie Peitz and the Louisville Colonels, now five games over .500, and they were still in the hunt. Their record stood at 70-65. There was plenty of baseball left for 1909!

That’s the update for the week ending September 4, 1909, one-hundred years ago in the American Association.

Thursday, September 3, 2009

Website Down!

Unfortunately, my brand new website at www.aaalmanac.com is sidelined for the time being. In my attempt to create a new website to host my many ballplayer grave photos, I over-wrote the content of the aaalmanac.com site and it all went kaput. The host site, justhost.com, is very unwieldy when it comes to such things, and I'm now searching for a new host site. Thankfully, I kept back-up files of most of the content I'd posted, so I hope to have aaalmanac.com up and running again in the very near future. Thanks for your patience!

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

New American Association Websites

The new and substantially improved American Association website has been up and running for a few weeks now. Please pay it a visit at

http://www.aaalmanac.com/

It includes tabs on teams, hitters, pitchers, managers, ballparks and products available for sale. It's a work in progress, so bear with me while I finish up the details. As of this writing the ballparks section isn't yet complete, but you'll get the idea.

In addition, I'm now periodically publishing my ballplayer grave photos at

http://www.lostengraving.deviantart.com/gallery/

While I do not consider this to be the permanent home of my collection of grave photos, it's the best thing I've found so far, and you can't beat the price (free). Hope you'll pay it a visit.

Eventually there will be a new site devoted to the grave photos, but I'm too busy to put it together right now. I'm currently working on the 2010 American Association Wall Calendar, and getting my notes together for next Almanac on the topic of Parkway Field in Louisville which I'm hoping to have out by Nov. 1. As if that weren't enough, I've completed my book proposal for the University of Minnesota Press on the topic of the rivalry between the Minneapolis Millers and St. Paul Saints. Data collection for that project has begun in earnest. It promises to be a very thorough treatment of the subject, but it may not be done in the amount of time they'd like it to be...

In other news, I've had a few hits on the items I'm selling on eBay, but it's slow going, as one might imagine. Just picked up a complete 1929 Minneapolis Millers ticket, and will post that here when it comes. Other than that, summer is drawing to a close with my Brewers looking not-so-good. High expectations at the start of the season have dissipated weeks ago, so now we're just along for the ride and hoping they can salvage some respect in the waning weeks.

Be sure to visit the new websites!

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

100 Years Ago This Week in the American Association

The week ending August 14, 1909 found the Minneapolis Millers in first place by a game and a half over the Milwaukee Brewers. The Millers had a record of 67-50 and were in the midst of a homestand at Nicollet Park.

On August 7, they defeated seventh-place Toledo for the fourth straight time, by a score of 8-2, in the first game of a Saturday doubleheader. The locals narrowly out-hit the Mud Hens 14-13 as pitcher Bill "Kiddo" Wilson teetered in the early going, Toledo scoring a run in the first and one in the third. Allowing only two hits, Wilson was relieved prematurely by Nick Altrock after one inning.

The Millers tallied four in the third against Toledo ace Hi West, the staff workhorse who wound up the season with a record of 18 wins, 14 losses. West, who allowed 13 hits in six innings, was apparently off his game a little, taking the loss. He was relieved by John Bushelman. According to the Sporting Life report in its August 21 edition,

"Minneapolis had better luck in bunching hits in both games and made it four straight from Toledo. Altrock relieved Wilson in the second inning of the first game and, although hit freely, kept the safeties scattered."

The Millers took the second game of the twin bill by a score of 4-2, completing the home sweep against the Mud Hens. The winning streak was stopped the next day by the Columbus Senators, the Association's fourth-place team, 7-5.

These were the days when the odd practice of beginning a new homestand mid-weekend were the norm.

On Monday, August 9, Minneapolis overwhelmed Columbus, 8-1, on a six-hitter by Fred Olmstead, the Miller ace who wound up the season with the league’s best winning percentage, .667 with his 24 of 36 decisions.

Their most decisive game of the week was followed by another win, as “Pongo Joe” Cantillon’s men capped Columbus again, 4-3, assuring themselves of a series win. The finale of the five-game set went to the Senators, as Bill “Derby Day” Clymer had salvaged a game against the steaming hot Millers, taking the August 11 contest, 8-4.

Cantillon’s crew wound up the week involved in a pair of shutouts against the visiting third-place Louisville Colonels led by catcher/manager Henry “Heine” Peitz. The Millers held on to win 1-0, behind the six-hit pitching of Irving “Young Cy” Young. Then on Friday, August 13, the Millers, whose .241 team batting average ranked second-best in the league in 1909, were blanked by Colonel starter Orville Selby “in a drizzling rain,” a four-hitter which resulted in a 1-0 win by the visitors.

None of the week’s Millers games included a home run...by either team at Nicollet Park. In fact, only 133 home runs were hit by American Association hitters all season in 1909, with fifth-place St. Paul leading the pack with a meager 26 long balls in 163 games. Again from the August 21 Sporting News:

“The hitting in the American Association is very light. never before in the A.A. history has there been such a low general average of batting as at the present time. Kruger [Arthur, outfielder, Columbus] is the only man in the Association hitting more than .300 for the season at the present time.”

After a 5-win week, Minneapolis still had a handle on the throne in the American Association, although its grip was tenuous.

The Milwaukee Brewers were not going away. Having held the top-spot for much of the season, the Brewers were now hanging on for dear life, managing to stay close in the race by winning four of six. Brewer pitcher Stoney McGlynn notched his ninth shutout of the season on August 9 against the Colonels. Louisville was in the thick of things as well, staying afloat despite losing four of its last seven.

The race was shaping up to be an exciting three-way entanglement, a battle which provided gripping entertainment to baseball fans across the midwest all summer long, 100 years ago this week.

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

100th Anniversary of Swayne Field in Toledo, Ohio


This past weekend was the 100th anniversary of the opening of the first double-decked stadium in the American Association, Swayne Field in Toledo, Ohio. Built to replace Armory Park which served as the home of the Toledo Mud Hens for seven-plus seasons since 1902, Swayne Field opened in historic fashion when it hosted the Columbus Senators on July 3, 1909.
With umpires Clarence “Brick” Owens and Ed Eckman officiating, the Mud Hens were first to score, thrilling the Toledo throng of 9,350 in a game which lasted three hours, thirty-five minutes. It was a battle for the ages between two closely matched teams.
In the first inning, Toledo posted three runs off Columbus starter Jacob “Lefty” Geyer. Center-fielder Homer Smoot, hitting third, scored on a two-run single by second-baseman Harry Hinchman, first-baseman Jeremiah Freeman following. Hinchman had five hits in seven at-bats on the day. The third run of the frame was scored by Charlie “Piano Legs” Hickman who crossed the plate on a ground ball by catcher Fred Abbott.
The Senators tallied next in the top half of the fourth, putting up four runs against Toledo starter Frank M. Owen.
Not to be out-done, the Hens stormed back with five runs in the fifth, making the score 8-4 in favor of the locals. Hinchman’s triple highlighted the frame.
Adding a pair in the seventh, Toledo padded their lead.
But then the barn doors blew open as the Senators scored five runs of their own, chasing Owen after 6 1/3. Adding another pair of in the eighth, Columbus had a 9-8 lead. But it didn’t last long.
In the Toledo half of the seventh, Hickman greeted reliever Clyde Goodwin with a Swayne Field salute, the first home run at the new digs, scoring Freeman. Hickman’s drive sailed over the right-field parapet 325 feet away,” according to the Toledo Blade, and gave the Hens a 10-9 lead.
Again Columbus mounted a comeback, scoring twice to recapture the edge in the eighth. A lone Toledo tally in the bottom of the ninth tied the game, breathing new life into the frenzied crowd.
A long string of zeros followed, but, amidst the early evening shadows, Columbus finally scored in the eighteenth inning. Center-fielder Art Kruger tripled to left for his sixth hit in nine at-bats! With two out, shortstop George Moriarty singled to bring home Kruger. The lead held, as Goodwin finished his 11 2/3 inning stint by shutting down the Hens in their half of the 18th. The Senators were the winner in a dramatic, high-potency contest. What a way to open a new ball park! After a 3 p.m. start, the game was finally completed at 6:35 p.m., the longest American Association game on record to date.
The line:
Columbus: 12 runs on 23 hits with 2 errors
Toledo: 11 runs on 16 hits with 3 errors.

Located at the corner of Detroit Avenue and Monroe Street, Swayne Field was named for long-time baseball enthusiast Noah H. Swayne (1847-1922), a Toledo lawyer and banker. constructed at a cost of $300,000. It was likely the largest venue in the American Association with an original capacity of 11,800 (West Washington Street Park at Indianapolis was on par with this figure, but the exact capacity is not known). The iron beam-and-concrete park, patterned after Forbes Field in Pittsburgh which had opened only weeks earlier, had a grandstand seating 4,800, while its upper deck could hold 1,000. The bleachers in left- and right-field held 2,500 and 3,500, respectively. Each original wooden bleacher section was replaced with a concrete-and-steel structure in 1928 as the overall capacity increased to 14,800; that included a new center-field bleacher section.

The original dimensions at Swayne Field:
382 feet down LF foul line
505 feet to dead CF
326 feet down RF foul line
72 feet between home plate and grandstand backstop

The park cost $300,000.
Principal Source: The Toledo Baseball Guide of the Mud Hens by Ralph LinWeber (1944).
Photo: Postcard published in 1909 depicting a capacity crowd at Swayne Field during its inaugural season as an American Association park.

Monday, May 25, 2009

Grave of Hugh Hill




My wife and I were able to visit Spring Hill Cemetery in Charleston, WV, on May 17 and found the grave of Hugh Ellis Hill, pictured here. The top view shows the landscape behind Hill's grave, second marker to the right in the foreground; the next shows a similar view for panoramic perspective.

Born July 21, 1879 at Ringgold in northern Georgia, Hill began his professional baseball career at the age of 21 with the Nashville Volunteers (or Vols) of the Southern Association in 1901 as a pitcher. The following season he plateaued as a moundsman, compiling a record of 22 wins, seven losses. Why his pitching career didn't develop after such a successful start is not immediately known.

In 1903 he played in his first season in the American Association, performing for both Nashville and the Kansas City Blues, when he showed considerable acumen for hitting. He posted a .400 mark in 75 at-bats for the Volunteers, and a .280 mark under Dale Gear in KC where he was used only as an outfielder.

A dependable performer with the Blues in 1904, Hill showed his speed as well as his durability, appearing in 140 games with 567 at-bats and a .261 batting average. He was among the leaders in various offensive categories, leading the league with 39 doubles; he out-paced his teammates with 148 hits and 21 stolen bases.

In 1905 Hill split the season between the Blues and the Buffalo Bisons of the Eastern League, appearing in a total of 96 games.

Returning as a full-timer to KC in 1906, Hill had a breakout season. He led the Association by appearing in 156 games (two beyond what was scheduled) and swatted .284 in 598 at-bats, ranking 20th in the league among hitters with 300+ official trips. Again he showed his fleetness afoot with 35 doubles and 32 stolen bases; in addition, he led the Blues with 10 triples and tied for the team lead with three home runs. His fine slugging average of .391 was a strong measure of his value to the team. The Blues finished sixth in '06 under manager Jimmie Burke at 69-79.

The 1907 season was Hill's last complete term with Kay-see. Showing remarkable stamina, he appeared in 152 games and hit .267 with a .376 slugging average. The lefty-bat/righty-throw Georgian led Burke's Blues with seven home runs and 30 stolen bases as the Kansas Citians elevated their league standing to the first division with a 78-76 record, finishing fourth.

Hill's career was on the decline after that. He appeared in only 33 games as a Blue in 1908, while playing for no other sanctioned teams. In 1909 he took up with the New Orleans Pelicans and Mobile Sea Gulls of the Southern Association for a combined 78 games, hitting .220 in 286 at-bats. At the age of 34 he attempted resurrecting his pro career with the San Antonio Bronchos of the Texas League, hitting a meager .154 in 39 at-bats.

Hill also played in the major leagues early in his career, performing for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1904 and the Cleveland Naps in 1903. He was the brother of another major leaguer, Bill Hill.

How he wound up buried at Spring Hill Cemetery in Charleston is a bit of a mystery, born in Georgia and dying in Cincinnati on Sept. 6, 1958. The Almanac will keep readers informed should any information come to light as to how he came to his final resting spot; could have been something to do with his wife. More to come.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Opening Day in the American Association -- 100 Years Ago Today!



The 1909 American Association season opened with a bang around the circuit. Who could have predicted that the Milwaukee Brewers would contend the entire season, battling the Louisville Colonels for the pennant as the league's premier team until the final days of the season. The Colonels, with Jimmie Burke at the helm and playing third-base, came within 4 games of the championship in 1908 with a convincing record of 88-65, finishing second in a close race with Charlie Carr's Indianapolis Indians Under manager Barry McCormick, who played in every game at second-base in 1908, the Brewers completed the season with a record of 71-83 in sixth place. But in the final days of the 1909 campaign, the Suds Men succumbed to the saber-rattling Colonels who took the crown by just 2.5 games!

It was a strange year in the American Association. Pitchers held the reigns, as the league's cumulative batting average was a paltry .237, down from .246 in 1908. League-leading Louisville had one of the worst team batting marks at .233, while the Brewers posted an ugly .232, a mere percentage point lower than their 1908 mark! Such bizarre numbers the Association never saw, and never would see again...in 1910, league hitting climbed to .243, the two lowest marks in league history!

Here's how the 1909 American Association Championship season began on April 14, 1909, one hundred years ago today:

The Toledo Mud Hens opposed the reigning league-champions, the Indianapolis Indians on the Tribe's home grown, West Washington Street Park. Hens' hurler Hi West faced off against Ralph Glaze, but first-baseman/manager Charlie Carr's Indians prevailed, 4-2, as Glaze struck out 8 and held the visitors to 6 hits before one of the largest crowds ever assembled there since its inception as an A.A. ballpark in 1905. Right-fielder Jack Hayden went 3-for-4 on the day with a double and a triple.

At Louisville's Eclipse Park, Jack battled Jack as the Columbus Senators were defeated by the Colonels of Louisville, 6-1, as Jack Halla squared off against the visitors' Jack Taylor. It was Ohio-native Taylor's only outing of the year. Halla allowed but five hits in the easy win in the only errorless opener. New player/manager Henry "Heinie" Peitz was off to a good start; Louisville won their first six games of the season.

Up at Milwaukee's Athletic Park, it was a battle of the "Louis'" as the Brewers took on the St. Paul Saints before a large and raucous crowd on the near-north side. Pitching for the Saints was the Wisconsin-born Native American hurler Louis LaRoy who was matched on the mound by Milwaukee native Louis Manske. The Brew Crew took the opener, 9-5, smashing out 15 hits and putting up a 5-spot in the seventh frame. The Saints made a valiant attempt at a come back, scoring 5 runs of their own in the ninth. The contest featured two home runs, the only long balls on the day: an unlikely shot by St. Paul shortstop Joe Bean and another by Milwaukee second-baseman Barry McCormick who went 3-for-5. McCormick was no longer the Brewer manager, his former role being taken on by J.J. McCloskey. Ill-fated league veteran shortstop Clyde "Rabbit" Robinson, hitting out of the lead-off spot, went 4-for-5 on the day. Robinson's death by blood poisoning in 1915 took him out of the game permanently, but he was active as a professional ballplayer up until the time of his premature demise.

At Kansas City's Association Park under Jimmy Collins (third-baseman/manager) the Minneapolis Millers defeated the Kansas City Blues behind a three-hitter by Fred Olmstead, 2-0. Held to just four hits off the perennial Ducky Swann, the Millers made 'em stick when they scored a pair in the seventh frame of the contest which took 1 hour, 35 minutes, the swiftest event of the day. Four Kansas City errors aided the Millers' cause.

Please write me at pureout@msn.com with any questions or comments.

Friday, April 3, 2009

Almanac Back Issues: Set 1


The Almanac is offering back issues for sale to readers with an interest in the old American Association. Included in this three-volume set are issues dedicated to three stars of the American Association, slugging Nick Cullop, home run hero Bunny Brief and pitching ace Stoney McGlynn. Format features: 5.5 x 8.5" booklet, stapled binding; color cover; self-published in 2001 and 2002. Set 1 sells for $10.00 including postage. Direct all inquiries to Rex Hamann at pureout@msn.com or mail a check to Rex Hamann, 14201 Crosstown Blvd. NW, Andover, MN 55304-3311. Paypal also accepted.

=========================================

Vol. 1, No. 1 November 2001: Nick Cullop

7 pages

Features overview of the American Association career of perennial minor league outfielder Nick Cullop

This seven-page look at the career of Nick Cullop features a statistical summary of the outfielder's American Association career and explains the search for Cullop's unmarked grave in the Columbus, Ohio area, an event which took place in 2001. Find out more about the great minor league career of Nick Cullop (born Heinrich Nicholas Kohlhepp).

==================

Vol. 1, No. 2 December 2001: Bunny Brief, Hitting Hero

8 pages

This introduction to one of the most feared hitters in league history features an eight-page summation of the American Association career (1913-1928) of Bunny Brief, an outfielder/first-baseman who ranks as perhaps the most potent all-around hitter in the history of the league. With a career which spanning the deadball era's last years and the start of the live-ball era in 1920, Brief showed great skill in his ability to adapt to professional pitching. In over 6,600 at-bats, Brief batted a career .331. You'll want to read more about this impressive hitting hero of old.

====================

Vol. 1, No. 3 January 2002 Stoney McGlynn, Milwaukee's Master Moundsman

8 pages

Describes the short but memorable record-setting American Association career of Milwaukee Brewers' pitcher Stoney McGlynn (1909-12), considered ''past his prime''...

This 8-page volume summarizes the pitching career of the legendary Stoney McGlynn who holds the all-time American Association record for shutouts in a single season. Learn about his fabulous 1909 season during which he almost tossed his arm off while the Milwaukee Brewers competed for the league championship. Features a complete record of the day-date, opponent and score of each shut-out he threw in 1909 and box score of McGlynn's first American Association game.

Friday, March 27, 2009

Ed Kenna, the Poet Pitcher





In 1905, the Louisville Colonels signed 27-year old Edward Benninghaus Kenna, a pitcher who started his professional career with the Toledo Mud Hens of the Interstate League in 1900. Kenna was an interesting figure in baseball's early days. He grew up in Charleston, West Virginia, the son of John Edward Kenna, a U.S. Congressional Representative and Senator (a sizable collection of his personal photographs may be viewed at the website for the West Virginia Historical Society through www.wvculture.org/history/wvmemory/photointro.html).

A most intriguing aspect of Kenna's life was his ability as a writer. He was known in baseball circles as the "poet pitcher," something I've known for some time. Not until I was researching my latest issue of the Almanac did I discover that he was actually a published poet. After his baseball career ended in 1907 he became an editor at the Charleston Gazette. He would succumb to a heart condition at the age of 34.

Kenna's baseball career wasn't notable for any particular reason, but he stood out for his literary talents. Amidst a rough and tumble throng of players who occupied mainly blue collar professions, Kenna was a sort of flower in the pasture. His poetry reflects a strong love of the outdoors, and is full of romantic verse which characterizes much of the poetry of the early 20th century. By today's standards it might seem superficial, but he was a prolific writer and was obviously dedicated to furthering his writing abilities.

While with Louisville in 1905 he established himself among the professional ranks with a record of 16-13. The following season he wasn't as successful from the mound, but he somehow managed to hit with grand authority, compiling a batting average of .325 while slugging .440, marks which distinguished him as an aggressive competitor in the American Association. Having suffered extensive injuries during a trolley car accident which took place at Kansas City in August, 1905, Kenna recovered miraculously after a dismal prognosis and he assembled a record of 12-21 with over 300 innings of work in 1906.

Prior to pitching for Louisville, Kenna played for Toledo before moving on to the Western Association's Wheeling Stogies in 1901. He was with the American League's Philadelphia Athletics for a short time in 1902; he spent the majority of that season with the Western League's Milwaukee Creams to which he would return in 1903. He was then signed by the Denver Grizzlies of the Western League in 1904. Finally, he wrapped up his career as a Louisville Colonel in 1907 when he won three, lost seven in 17 games, but he was unable to muster the batting strength which had highlighted his previous year's work.

Kenna's book of poetry, published posthumously in 1912, is entitled "Songs of the Open Air and Other Poems." I was recently able to acquire a near-perfect copy of this tribute to the poetic life of the former ballplayer. It was published through the efforts of his wife, Frances B. Kenna (nee Beardsley), and is dedicated, simply but poignantly, "To Our Boy." Among the selections included in this 138-page volume are such poems as "Awakened," "Ballad of the Maine," "Fall Time in the Country," "Father Tabb," "Huntin' Time is Comin'," "Inspiration," "I Want to go Afishing" "Real Raggedy Man (to James Whitcomb Riley)," "Supplication," and "Roses of Kanawha."

Here is one of his shorter poems:

To A Butterfly

Whence comest thou?
Art thou born of earth,
So fragile, fair and featly wrought?
Or hast thus in Love's brain found birth
A child of beauty and of thought?
Or art thou waft through summer skies
An earth blown bloom of paradise?

Edward Benninghaus Kenna died while attempting to recuperate from his illness at Grant, Florida, on March 22, 1912.